Book Review: Rewrite The Stars by Emma Heatherington

Rewrite The Stars

I enjoyed ‘A Miracle On Hope Street’ by Emma Heatherington last year – and this is another offering by her with Christmas themes (although only loosely).  I was lucky enough to be offered a free copy from Netgalley in return for an honest review (and it wasn’t until the end and the mention of Bradley Cooper gifs (I was surprised it wasn’t David Beckham to be honest) that I remembered my friend was the author’s editor!

Here’s the blurb:

“It’s never too late to say I love you…
A stunning Christmas romance for fans of Josie Silver and Jojo Moyes
From the moment they meet one December day there’s something between Charlotte Taylor and her brother’s best friend, Tom Farley. But Tom’s already taken and Charlie has to let him go…
It’s another five years before their paths cross again only a secret from the past forces Charlie to make a choice. She promises herself she’ll never look back…
The years pass and Charlie moves on with her life but she can never forget Tom. He’s always there whispering ‘What if?’.
Can Charlie leave the life she has built for one last chance with Tom? Or is the one that got away not really the one at all…?”

I really enjoyed this!

Charlotte / Charlie and Tom’s paths cross over the period of the book – starting at a one off meeting and then progressing.  Some of this happens at Christmas – but that’s not a massive feature of the book (so don’t think you need to save it until the festive period to properly appreciate it or anything, I was fine reading it by the pool in the sunshine!)

Whilst the Charlie / Tom relationship is the main thread running through the book – and who doesn’t love a ‘the one who got away’ story – their relationships with other people are also really well developed.

It’s set it Ireland in a number of different rural and city locations – and they are described really well and evoke the differing vibes of the geographical areas.

It weaves historic information in with present day so that the whole back story is eventually unravelled.  I did guess some of it – but that didn’t detract from the book and wanting to finish reading it.

Occasionally I did want to punch Charlotte and tell her just to be honest – but I guess that might not have been such a twisty and turny book!! Overall it was a lovely easy read and I’d recommend it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

Book Review: The Postcard by Zoe Folbigg

The Postcard

I’d seen this on Netgalley and it really appealed – but I realised it was a sequel, and I am a dyed in the wool rule follower – so went on a hunt for ‘The Note’ first!  I found it for free on Amazon and so quickly devoured – and enjoyed that first.  Now here is the blurb for The Postcard:

“A year after the kiss that brought them together in a snowy train-station doorway, Maya and James are embarking on another journey – this time around the world.
The trip starts promisingly, with an opulent and romantic Indian wedding. But as their travels continue, Maya fears that ‘love at first sight’ might not survive trains, planes and tuk tuks, especially when she realises that what she really wants is a baby, and James doesn’t feel the same.
Can Maya and James navigate their different hopes and dreams to stay together? Or is love at first sight just a myth after all… “

I read the first chapter and was completely confused and thought I’d been hoodwinked – as it was seemingly totally random!  However, it soon became evident that there were two stories running concurrently which I suspected would link up further on (which they did!)

As well as following Maya and Train Man’s story, and the story of Manon (the one I thought had hoodwinked me!) it also follows the story of Maya’s BFF, Nena, back in London who is starting life as a mother.  The inter connection of them all was done really well (and whilst I know the story of Maya and Train Man is true to life – I wondered how much of this, and the interconnecting stories, was too?)

The descriptions of places on Maya and James’s travels was great – and really evoked the feeling of being there (even if ‘there’ involved self administered colonics!!!) but equally Nena’s story – drowning in life with a newborn – was also really believable.

As with the first book in the series, it was an easy read that kept me intrigued and wanting to read on and I enjoyed it.

I was lucky enough to be given an advanced review copy from Netgalley – but you can buy this later this week!  (But I would recommend reading The Note first to appreciate The Postcard fully)

My 7 year old always asks what I’m reading – and so she knows it’s been The Note followed by The Postcard – so she’s been coming up with suggestions for the next book in the series – The Piece of Paper, The Book etc etc.

 

 

 

 

 

Book Review: The Note by Zoe Folbigg

The Note

 

I’d seen the book ‘The Postcard by Zoe Folbigg’ on Netgalley – but on further investigations saw this was a sequel to The Note – and I am a bit of a rule follower #understatement – so it didn’t seem right to start at the second book.  I hopped onto Amazon – and saw I could borrow it for free – so 2 books for nothing – on to a winner!!

Here’s the blurb:

“Love at first sight – based on the true story of one girl and her ‘train man’…
One very ordinary day, Maya Flowers sees a new commuter board her train to London, and suddenly the day isn’t ordinary at all. Maya knows immediately and irrevocably that he is The One.   Every day they go through the same routine; he with his head in a book and her dreaming of their happily-ever-after. But eventually, Maya plucks up the courage to give Train Man a note asking him out for a drink.
And so begins a story of sliding doors, missed opportunities and finding happiness where you least expect it. Based on the true story that everyone is talking about, The Note is an uplifting, life-affirming reminder that taking a chance can change everything… “

This is a lovely, easy, inoffensive read.  It follows the story of Maya and her friends and family – and ‘Train Man’! It twists and turns, and there are lots of ‘sliding doors’ moments – but it’s enjoyable throughout.  Given it’s based on a true story, and the author’s Amazon page says she now lives with Train Man and their kids – you kind of know it’s got to come good – but it certainly takes a convoluted way to get there!!

It was a fun, escapist read.  It’s not going to win any literary awards – but sometimes it’s good to read something light and fluffy that does exactly what it says on the tin.  And it was free from Amazon library or something (I am such a technophobe sometimes) so that’s got to be good!!

A perfect summer beach read.

 

 

 

 

Book Review: Beneath The Surface by Fiona Neill

Beneath The Surface

I read – and enjoyed – The Betrayals by Fiona Neill last year, and so was chuffed when the publisher emailed me to ask if I’d like an advanced review copy – clearly I said yes!! I finished it last week – on publication date – but it’s taken me this long to write a review – but at least that means if you like the sound of it you can download it immediately!

Here is the Amazon blurb:

“After a chaotic childhood, Grace Vermuyden is determined her own daughters will fulfil the dreams denied to her. Lilly is everyone’s golden girl, the popular, clever daughter she never had to worry about. So when she mysteriously collapses in class, Grace’s carefully ordered world begins to unravel.

Dark rumours swirl around their tight-knit community on the edge of the Fens as everyone comes up with their own theories about what happened. Consumed with paranoia, and faced with increasing evidence that Lilly has been leading a secret life, Grace starts to search for clues.

Left to her own devices, ten-year-old Mia develops some wild theories of her own that have unforeseen and devastating consequences for the people she loves most.

Beneath the Surface explores the weight of the past upon the present, the burden of keeping secrets and what happens when children get caught in the undercurrents of adult relationships. “

Again – I really enjoyed this domestic drama, which twists and turns just like Fiona Neill’s previous book.  I guess I also empathised with Grace even more having daughters of a similar age (although I’ve got so many kids, I often have one or two that are the right age for characters in books!!!)

As it says in the subtitle ‘everyone lies’ – and you know that people are lying from the start – but you’re not quite sure why or how, but it all becomes clear as the book progresses – eventually!

Lilly is superficially a golden child and girlie swot at school – but is leading a secret teenage life.  Her younger sister, Mia, is a more complicated character who struggles fitting in at school – and has two friends, Tas (from the local traveller community) and Elvis (an eel she keeps in a bucket in her bedroom!).  Patrick, the father, is in financial difficulties – and Grace, the mother, is desperately trying to provide a stable family environment for her daughters that she didn’t have herself.  There are other peripheral characters – an Aunt and Uncle, teenager friends, other parents – and everything intertwines.

The descriptions of the dust problems in their new house, the geography of the Fens and the bad weather are also really evocative (not sure I’ll be going to the Fens on holiday any time soon!)

Overall I did enjoy this and was pleased to see how it all panned out and would recommend it. Thank you to the publisher and NetGalley for my ARC.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Book Review: Just Eat It by Laura Thomas PhD

Just Eat It

I saw this book recommended by Helen Thorn of The Scummy Mummies fame – who is also famous for her @HelenWearsASize18 insta posts, and the Fat Lot Of Good podcasts (I admit, I sound like a slightly stalkerish fan….).  She is a real advocate of body positivity – and uses the hashtag #effyourbeautystandards on a regular basis.   As I am very easily lead, I immediately bought the book (I have a number of times bought items of clothing Helen has been photographed wearing too #numberonefan).  I expected it to be funny, entertaining, sweary and interesting (pretty much sums up Helen too) – and the book is all of those things.  It’s also MASSIVE and FULL of references to medical studies etc.  I hadn’t expected quite so much content – and was surprised – but also delighted (as I am a total information geek at heart).

Here is the blurb on the book:

“Just Eat It isn’t just a book. It’s part of a movement to help us take back control over our bodies. To free us from restrictive dieting, disordered eating and punishing exercise. To reject the guilt and anxiety associated with eating and, ultimately, to help us feel good about ourselves.

This anti-diet guide from registered nutritionist Laura Thomas PhD can help you sort out your attitude to food and ditch punishing exercise routines. As a qualified practitioner of Intuitive Eating – a method that helps followers tune in to innate hunger and fullness cues – Thomas gives you the freedom to enjoy food on your own terms.

There are no rules: only simple, practical tools and exercises including mindfulness techniques to help you recognise physiological and emotional hunger, sample conversations with friends and colleagues, and magazine and blog critiques that call out diet culture.

So, have you ever been on a diet? Spent time worrying that you looked fat when you could have been doing something useful? Compared the size of your waistline to someone else’s? Felt guilt, actual guilt, about the serious crime of . . . eating a doughnut? You’re not alone. Just Eat It gives you everything you need to develop a more trusting, healthy relationship with food and your body.”

I started reading it with an open mind.  I had to concentrate quite hard as it’s quite medical and technical – it’s not a laugh a minute ‘just stuff your face with doughnuts’ that I was expecting – and this was a very pleasant surprise.  I also liked the fact that whilst the author is clearly incredibly well educated – she also isn’t averse to a bit of swearing – nutribollocks being a particular favourite!!

However, when I got to page 95 I was quite concerned that Laura Thomas could actually read my mind when she said:

“It becomes tempting to think that a diet will be the solution: maybe if you just lose Xlbs you’ll be happy with your body and then you can give this intuitive eating thing a go.  But here’s the thing. Dieting doesn’t fix poor body image.  It doesn’t heal your relationship with food.”

The stuff on intolerances was also really interesting – and I’d actually heard of some of this as my sister has done quite a lot of research into IcG and IcE readings – she lives in Germany where intolerance testing seems much more tolerated (pun intended!) in the mainstream than it is in the UK.

I also thought it really really interesting that the book is written by a nutritionist – but she is adamant that food is not medicine. To quote directly:

“Nutrition can play an important role in helping prevent and manage certain conditions, but so can exercise, reducing alcohol intake, getting better quality sleep, reducing stress, stopping smoking, being gifted genetically, having strong social bonds / community, therapy, not being poor (as though it was a simple choice), living somewhere that isn’t super polluted (again, like it’s a choice), oh yeah and ACTUAL MEDICINE.  Part of the issues with the food is medicine rhetoric is that it can inadvertently put people off seeking pharmacotherapies by creating a culture of shame around prescription medicines.  Antidepressants are a perfect example, there is so much stigma around them (and mental health more generally), yet for some people they are lifesaving.”

 I am so glad I read a hard copy of this book – there are a lot of corners folded over as there was so much I felt should be quoted in a review as it was just so insightful!  Although I possibly could just have regurgitated the entire book and this blog would be a sea of blue to show you how much I loved it!

Historically I have been successful at low carbing (successful being I lost weight from it………..) – and met lots of good friends through this way of eating – but I did LOVE LOVE LOVE the quote “And I mean this isn’t based on actual science, but there seems to be a direct correlation between being on a low-carb diet and being a complete prick on Twitter.” !!!

This way of eating also introduced me to a good friend who at one point was morbidly obese, and had many health conditions that all of the professionals said were as a result of her weight.  Over a number of years she lost a truly mind-blowing amount of weight due to bariatric surgery – but were her medical issues solved?  One was – but by no means all. Saying ‘you need to lose weight’ was the easy option that has now been taken away from her medics.

Whilst I’ve been reading the book, Laura Thomas has raised significant support against the Cancer Research UK ad campaign that obesity CAUSES cancer.  I have to say I agree that this run of adverts does leave a sour taste and perpetuates the fat shaming that is prevalent throughout society.  From personal anecdotal evidence, in the last few years 3 friends have died from cancers, and a further handful of friends have beaten the horrid disease. NONE OF THEM WERE OBESE. .  The full open letter from Laura Thomas and a bunch of other experts is here.

Chapter 9 stated that pigs are smarter than your average gym bro – and having just acquired 2 piglets I would have to concur.  Yes, when you feed them they stuff their faces and shovel up food like there’s no tomorrow – BUT – they know when to stop!  They don’t eat until they vomit, they don’t HAVE to finish the bowl of food.  These pigs are naturally intuitive eaters!

62407350_10157778057484363_4650191220574781440_n

The book looks at movement in a bigger body.  It talks about the fact that “There’s an enormous fat -phobic double standard in society, where fat people are ‘expected’ to work out (because fat people should want to lose weight, duh), yet are often excluded from the conversation around activity and not given access to the same tools and resources as thin people.  For example, not having sports bras or active wear available in your size.”  It also talks about larger people being embarrassed to eat in public as they expect people to judge them. I have to say I was embarrassed to be seen reading this book in public – as I expected people to read the title and assume I obviously had no problem with ‘just eating it’ given my size…………

BUT – it’s given me a lot to think about.  I finished reading this book whilst away for a few days with my husband.  I decided to give myself permission to EAT ALL THE FOOD. But this didn’t mean I went into a total binge-fest. Bizarrely, because I’d decided I could have anything – I didn’t drink creamy cocktails all day – I had the gin based cocktail that sounded (and tasted!) lush.  I ordered the steak and chips – but didn’t feel I had to clean my plate – and left a bit of both.  This was totally weird.  I was eating when I was hungry and until I felt full – not eating just because it was the right time of day, and not eating everything in front of me because I’d paid for it……..

I also posted a photo of myself in my swimming costume on social media.  It was when our eldest daughter had texted to say that her horses need new kit – as you can see, we both totally agreed!  This is me in a swimming costume. This is me who has carried 4 amazing babies. This is me who likes wine / chips / cake. THIS IS ME. (Full on Keala Settle at the side of the pool due to wine consumption in a very hot Dubai!!)

66451845_10157802658159363_5780892591616688128_n

My husband also commented that I walked around the swimming pool with way more confidence than I usually would (to be honest, this could have been a fast strut due to the ground burning my feet – but we’ll take the compliments when they come!)

This book has given me so much food for thought (pun deliberately intended again!).  I think I will revisit the book again and again – and will definitely investigate some of the recommended social media accounts and podcasts.  There is so much more to life than trying to fit into a smaller pair of knickers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Book Review: The First Time I Saw You by Emma Cooper

I loved the debut novel ‘The Songs of Us‘ by Emma Cooper that was published last year – so when the publisher emailed to ask if I’d like an advanced review copy of her second book I jumped at the chance!

 

The First Time I Saw You

Here’s the blurb:

“Lost:
Six-foot-two Irish man who answers to the name Samuel McLaughlin. 
Has weak shins and enjoys show tunes.
If found, please return to Sophie Williams.
Before Sophie met Samuel she saw the world in grey. 
Before Samuel met Sophie, he never believed in love at first sight.
When they first meet, something tells them they are meant to be. 
But fate has other ideas.
Now they have lost each other and can’t see a way back. 
But they’ve already changed each other’s lives in more ways 
than they ever expected…”

I was slightly nervous before I started reading this that I wouldn’t love it as much as Emma Cooper’s first book – and that had a very distinct USP – and I wondered how she’d follow that – and if she’d have a ‘difficult second album’ issue going – but my fears were totally unfounded!

It starts off in Washington – somewhere the husband and I visited a couple of years ago – and whilst you don’t have to have been to enjoy the book, I loved imagining the places.  I also should confess that the fact Sophie is an accountant was very exciting – as that’s what I trained to do, and you don’t often get accountants as main characters.  I think I’ve mentioned before I’m still annoyed that the TV programmes This Life was based around lawyers rather than accountants – as we had a very similar life in the mid 90s!  Anyway – I digress…………

The book is told from Sophie and Samuel’s point of view week by week – so often you’re hearing the same story from the other person’s point of view – which is really clever.

The settings change – with Shropshire, Wales and Derry also featuring.  (Clearly I imagined Samuel’s family in Londonderry to be exactly like characters from the fabulous TV show ‘Derry Girls’) And one of my friends is going to be very excited that her home town of Machynlleth features!!  But the different geography provides excellent settings.

Rather than having one ‘Sliding Doors’ moment, there are multiple cases throughout the book where Sophie and Sam’s stars aren’t quite aligned – but I found that added to the pace of the book and really made me want to read on.

Whilst the book is based on the two main characters, their relationships with their families and friends are also explored.  I particularly liked the different relationships they had with their respective sisters.  Sam’s parents – Mr and Mrs McLaughlin – are lovely – and I think I might refer to the husband as Mr Price henceforth!

There are some big emotional themes running through the whole book – but without the unusual-ness of Melody’s singing from ‘The Songs of Us’ – and all are integral to the story.  I don’t want to include any spoilers by telling you what they are though……

The epilogue had me WEEPING last night – which seems to be the same effect all of Emma Cooper’s books have had on me – but that is definitely the sign of a good book.

All in all I would thoroughly recommend this book to everyone and anyone!

A big thank you to the publisher and NetGalley for my ARC.

 

 

Book Review: Then She Vanishes by Claire Douglas

Then She Vanishes

I was emailed by the publisher to ask if I’d like to read this new thriller.  I’ve not read anything by Claire Douglas before, but the blurb appealed – so I said ‘yes please’!

Here is the aforementioned blurb:

“THE ONLY THING MORE SHOCKING THAN THE FIRST CHAPTER . . . IS THE LAST. .
Everything changed the night Flora Powell disappeared
Heather and Jess were best friends – until the night Heather’s sister vanished.
Jess has never forgiven herself for the lie she told that night.
Nor has Heather.
But now Heather is accused of an awful crime. And Jess is forced to return to the sleepy seaside town where they grew up, to ask the question she’s avoided for so long:
What really happened the night Flora disappeared?”

The book is set in the present day (well, actually 2012 – but it feels like the present day) and then back in the mid 90s.  It flicks between the two time periods really well – and totally evokes the feeling of that time.  I was a similar age to the characters in the 90s and the references – particularly to music and clothing were spot on!

The chapters are told from different characters perspectives which also keeps the momentum up.

It was one of those books that you want to read quickly to see how it all develops.  The twists and turns are so exciting.  Just when you think you’ve sussed what’s going on – another curved ball is thrown!  I can’t tell you too much about the plot without giving it away – and you need to be shocked as a reader as it unfolds!

The literary style is not high brow – but that didn’t matter to me – I just enjoyed the storyline and it’s fast pace.

The characters all had flaws – and sometimes you wanted to give some of them a good shake – but I was still interested to see what happened to them all – and the relationships between them.

The blurb had said the only thing more shocking than the first chapter is the last – and I have to say that because of that I’d kind of guessed what was going to happen – but only right near the end of the book.

Overall a great read and I would recommend downloading it when it comes out on Kindle next week.  I’ll also be checking out the authors back catalogue in the future.

A massive thank you to the author, publisher and NetGalley for my advanced review copy in return for a review.

Book Review: Notes On A Nervous Planet by Matt Haig

I am generally a one book woman, I don’t like being unfaithful to a book by starting another one before I’ve finished the first.  However, I have a large TBR pile – and a mix of ‘proper’ books and Kindle books, and a mix of fiction and non-fiction.  So in a bid to ‘spice up my life’ I’ve decided to have one fiction (Kindle) and one non fiction (hard copy) on the go at a time.  Honestly – I live life on the edge sometimes!!

One of my lovely friends gave me this book for my birthday earlier in the year.  She LOVES Matt Haig and thought I would enjoy this too.  We have often recommended or given each other books – who doesn’t love getting a surprise book through the post?  (Oh – and if you want to send a book and other goodies, then the fabulous Don’t Buy Her Flowers who I’ve blogged about before way back when they’d just started, do a great book package – which even includes this exact book – this is not an #ad – I just love their work!!)

Anyway – back to the book!

Notes on a Nervous Planet

Here’s the blurb:

“The world is messing with our minds. What if there was something we could do about it?
Looking at sleep, news, social media, addiction, work and play, Matt Haig invites us to feel calmer, happier and to question the habits of the digital age. This book might even change the way you spend your precious time on earth.”

The recommendations for this book are immense – lots of famous people singing its praises – which always makes me nervous.  What if I don’t like it?  And I think I therefore started reading this like a bit of a petulant child. Waiting to be wowed.

Quite early on I realised, this is not earth shattering content.  It is not telling me anything I didn’t already know – but, it really helps to stop and think about things like this sometimes.  Life is so busy sometimes (made busier by social media, blogging about books etc) that you don’t think about what you’re doing – you just continue on the hamster wheel of life.

So about a third in I realised that this book was actually brilliant at making me stop and think.  And it made so much sense.

At times I felt a little bit smug – I don’t take my phone to bed with me (we’ve always left them downstairs to charge, not through deliberately thinking about our mental health – it’s just always been our habit) and I’m also not bothered what people think of what I post on social media – I overshare good or bad (whilst I was suffering with recurrent piles my husband reckoned he couldn’t go to the Co-op in our village without someone asking about my arse) and I don’t filter the f*ck out of photos either.  Do not fear, there are no piles photos – but I did recently share a photo of my extremely wonky bosoms (shoulder protectors when clay pigeon shooting are not designed for women with ample chests!)
60500585_10157626112404363_3566780965629984768_n

But I do sometimes check back to see how many ‘likes’ – or in this instance LOLs – a photo has got.  And this book made me stop and think.  Why?  I’m a 45 year old, happily married mother of 4 – do I really need the validation of knowing I’ve brightened someone’s day with an amusing photo?  (Although is entertaining other people better than people aspiring to my filtered / air brushed body shape #nevergonnahappen!)

I’m lucky that I’ve never had a full on anxiety / panic attack – but lots of people close to me do struggle with these things – and as a parent  (and  wife / cousin / friend) it’s something I’m having to be much more aware of – so stopping to think about that was really helpful.

Matt Haig also sings the praise of nature – and it’s not something I’d thought about much – despite it being an intrinsic part of our life now.  Last Autumn we moved the office for our construction company from an industrial estate in the suburbs of Birmingham to a 6 acre site in the countryside outside Brum.  At the office we also now have chickens and pigs and a lot of green space.  It really ‘feels’ different – and if you’re having a stressy day – being able to pop outside and chat to the chickens is a welcome break.

chickens and pigs

My husband – whose anxiety often manifests itself in obsessive cleaning, particularly vacuuming, now has an additional outlet – sitting on his tractor mowing the 6 acres is his new escape.   It’s also been good for us as a family – the children are more than happy to come and help with the animals and plants – and it gets them away from their devices too – which, as the book says, are pretty omnipresent for almost everyone nowadays.  We are very lucky that we have this asset on our doorstep, and I realise not everyone can work somewhere so lovely – but there are lots of green spaces in the UK – even in our big cities.  I remember way back in the 90s when studying to be an accountant a friend and I would go and sit in an underpass in the middle of Birmingham where there was a planted garden at lunchtime (although there was some confusion when someone misheard and thought I’d been in this friends underpants not underpass during the lunch break).

Some of the Amazon reviews of this book comment about it being disjointed and a random collection of the authors thoughts – and I can see where they’re coming from – but it didn’t distract from the overall message for me.  But then – I did have it as my toilet book (back to my bowel issues again!) and so read it in small chunks, and maybe I would have felt differently if I’d sat down to read it for a solid few hours. (Small chunks / solid – I’m not going to go there….…..)

I think anything in this day and age that makes you stop and smell the grass / coffee is a good thing.

I enjoyed it so much I posted it to my cousin who I thought would like it too.  Admittedly the card I sent with it probably isn’t on message with the book itself which also looks at alcohol use / misuse – but hey ho, baby steps!!

IMG_2677 (002).PNG

 

Book Review: Why Mummy Doesn’t Give A ****! by Gill Sims

May half term was the usual #funtimes #soblessed – juggling 4 kids with no childcare, the eldest child of the 4 being mid GCSEs, so eggshells were being trodden on, and we still needed to run our construction company.

Then – on the last day of the week – I was emailed by the publisher asking if I’d like to read an advanced review copy of Gill Sims new book Why Mummy Doesn’t Give A F*ck!  I was beyond excited.  I have LOVED the previous 2 books in the series – Why Mummy Drinks and Why Mummy Swears – so couldn’t wait to catch up with Ellen and co again.

Why Mummy

Here’s the blurb:

“Family begins with a capital eff.
I’m wondering how many more f*cking ‘phases’ I have to endure before my children become civilised and functioning members of society? It seems like people have been telling me ‘it’s just a phase!’ for the last fifteen bloody years. Not sleeping through the night is ‘just a phase.’ Potty training and the associated accidents ‘is just a phase’. The tantrums of the terrible twos are ‘just a phase’. The picky eating, the back chat, the obsessions. The toddler refusals to nap, the teenage inability to leave their beds before 1pm without a rocket being put up their arse. The endless singing of Frozen songs, the dabbing, the weeks where apparently making them wear pants was akin to child torture. All ‘just phases!’ When do the ‘phases’ end though? WHEN?
Mummy dreams of a quirky rural cottage with roses around the door and chatty chickens in the garden. Life, as ever, is not going quite as she planned. Paxo, Oxo and Bisto turn out to be highly rambunctious, rather than merely chatty, and the roses have jaggy thorns. Her precious moppets are now giant teenagers, and instead of wittering at her about who would win in a fight – a dragon badger or a ninja horse – they are Snapchatting the night away, stropping around the tiny cottage and communicating mainly in grunts – except when they are demanding Ellen provides taxi services in the small hours. And there is never, but never, any milk in the house. At least the one thing they can all agree on is that rescued Barry the Wolfdog may indeed be The Ugliest Dog in the World, but he is also the loveliest.”

This picks up when Jane and Peter are 15 and 13 – which is pretty much the age of my oldest 2 children.  I love that the 3 books have started with kids the age of my littlest pair, and now they’re the age of my eldest pair #relevanttome.

It is just sooooo spot on with references of life with teenagers.

I thought I was the only person whose teenage daughter refers to them as ‘mother’ in a disparaging  way – but seemingly not!

I’m also not sure I’ve ever read a book that has referenced The Suite Life On Deck (a slightly rubbish American kids TV programme which my kids loved when they were younger – and I’m not sure I’d ever realised that Zack and Cody (the twins in it) were played by the actors who played Ben in Friends – so this book is also very educational!!)

I could quote reference after reference – but I don’t want to ruin it for you – as you’ll also be nodding and laughing along when you read it.

Although – my absolute favourite part is when Ellen says that parents’ evening should be parent’s evening because she’s going on her own.  Who doesn’t love an apostrophe gag?!? (I am such a geek, sometimes I want to punch myself……….)

The book covers some big topics – death / divorce / moving house – but does it brilliantly, and with great ‘realness’ (not sure that’s even a proper word) and emotion.

On a personal level, and another brilliant reference point for me, we’ve just had chickens too – also starting off with 3 (Bertha, Wispa and Crunchie rather than Paxo, Oxo and Bisto – I’m disappointed we didn’t go for those names, particularly as they are partial to sage and onion stuffing and gravy – as a friend pointed out, feeding them that is practically pre-loading) – but have now added a cockerel, 8 further chickens (2 of which are partially sighted) and 2 micro pigs to our menagerie. I have also likened myself to Barbara from the Good Life (when I’d always wanted to be more Margot!) but without the dungarees.

chickens and pigs

Gill Sims is so bloody good at writing books.  Other parenting blogs have tried to make the leap to books and it’s just not translated as well (mentioning no names) but Gill’s books are all BRILLIANT.  If you haven’t read the first 2 (and don’t mind a bit of potty mouthed language), then download them IMMEDIATELY – and pre order this for when it’s out later this month.  I would go as far as to say this one is my favourite of the three!!

A massive thank you to Netgalley and the publisher for an advanced review copy.

 

 

 

 

Book Review: Vox by Christina Dalcher

Vox

Lots of friends had raved about Vox in our Facebook ‘book club’ – and when we had our inaugural real life book club (basically just a few of us in the pub, drinking gin and chatting about books!) I was lucky enough to be lent a copy.  I’m always nervous when people have loved something, what if I don’t, and then they think I’m weird?!  But one of my best friends said it was the first book she’d got truly invested in since Eleanor Oliphant, I had high hopes!

Here’s the blurb:

“Silence can be deafening.

Jean McClellan spends her time in almost complete silence, limited to just one hundred words a day. Any more, and a thousand volts of electricity will course through her veins.
Now the new government is in power, everything has changed. But only if you’re a woman.
Almost overnight, bank accounts are frozen, passports are taken away and seventy million women lose their jobs. Even more terrifyingly, young girls are no longer taught to read or write.
For herself, her daughter, and for every woman silenced, Jean will reclaim her voice. This is only the beginning…

[100 WORD LIMIT REACHED]”

I need not have been concerned – I also really enjoyed Vox!

It’s set in the US and feels like it could be the present day.  Whilst the premise is that society in America has changed and all women and girls can only speak 100 words a day – and initially that sounds ridiculous – but when you see the back story and how it’s developed, it is also worryingly possible………..

The link between the President and his team and religion is reminiscent of the current situation across the Atlantic.  I usually steer clear of religion and politics on social media – but it’s intrinsically part of this book.  The establishment believe that a woman’s place is solely in the home caring for her family – and consequently girls don’t need to be taught to read and write – and maths skills are only for weighing out cooking ingredients etc.

That is until the aforementioned establishment need Jean’s work skills from her previous life as a scientist!

The book follows what happens next and Jean’s relationships with her family, friends, neighbours, colleagues and those in power.  It is BRILLIANT.  So clever and intricate – but also so horribly, horribly plausible.

Jean was clearly a super intelligent, high achieving woman before these rules were put in place – and struggles massively with authority – but I don’t want to give away any spoilers…..

I found the relationship with her eldest son the most interesting – and also really disturbing……

I’ve read that the booked is a reworking of The Handmaid’s Tale – but I haven’t read that so can’t really comment – but as a standalone book, I really enjoyed it.